Animal collecting with Gerald Durrell

When Bob Golding was 18, he wrote to Gerald Durrell who agreed to take him along on an animal collecting expedition to the then British Cameroons in West Africa. Golding is immortalized as “young assistant Bob” in Durrell’s book A Zoo in my Luggage.

You can read Golding’s story and see some photos from the expedition on his website here.

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‘Can you help Gerald Durrell’s family document his life?’

Bournemouth photos from ‘Whatever Happened to Margo?’

This week, the Bournemouth Echo is running an appeal by Lee Durrell, Gerald Durrell‘s widow, asking for information on Gerald’s life in Bournemouth.

Together with Gerald’s nephew (Margo’s son) Gerry Breeze, Lee is organizing an exhibition on Jersey about Gerald’s Bournemouth days. The text of the Echo story is below, plus a link to the site. Anyone with information is invited to email Echo reporter Faith Eckersall, whose email address is given at the end of the piece.

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‘Mother’ Durrell, 1961

Louisa Durrell, ‘Mother’, with a chimp.

Photograph by Loomis Dean for Life, taken in Jersey in 1961.

Dean came to photograph Lawrence Durrell and his wife Claude during their visit to Gerald Durrell on Jersey in 1961.

Gorilla born at Durrell!

A baby western lowland gorilla was born on Thursday at the Durrell Wildlife Trust in Jersey, the first for nine years. The baby’s mother is named Hlala Kahilli, and is keeping the baby close, so it’s not been possible to determine the newborn’s sex yet.

From the Durrell website:

This baby is the first to be born at Durrell for nine years following the introduction of new dominant silverback Badongo, who incidentally also celebrates his thirteenth birthday today. Whilst this is Badongo’s first baby, Hlala Kahilli is an experienced mother and this is her fourth baby.

Mark Brayshaw Head of Animal Collection at Durrell said, “We are delighted with the great news and so far the mother and infact are doing well, but as with all births we need to be extra cautious during the first few days. At the moment the group including the new parents are all very relaxed and our keepers are remaining as hands off as possible as the group appears quite settled.”

Western lowland gorillas are classified as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.